Darning Step 1: Identify the torn clothing Tips

Darning with a sewing machine is one of the
easy ways through which repairs on torn clothes can be done, without
having to add patches, too much skill or planning. Unlike other types of
sewing darning does not consider the nature of the material or even how it
has been worn out.

 

Figure 1

v Materials needed for Darning

Sewing machine
Worn or torn clothing
Thread

v Procedure and Method

            Step 1:
Identify the torn clothing

       Tips

·     
Check
careful the torn part of the clothing

·     
Identify
the reason why it is torn; for instance, is it getting weak from the salt
crystals while using it to change of wetsuits

·     
Define
whether the rip requires normal darning or zigzag darning

Warning

·     
If
the torn clothing is rotten or very old, it is better to give it a rest,
because while darning it will continue to rip from where it is stitched

Step 2: Getting ready to Darn

Figure 2

Tips

·     
Ensure
that the sewing machine is well placed and stable

·     
Check
whether the needle is well place and ready for the thread

·     
Place
the thread depending on the color of the torn clothing

Recommendation

·     
With
darning the color of the thread does not really matter as one can utilize
garish contrasting thread.

·     
A
gold thread is usually the best for garnishing as it blends with several colors

Step 3: Start the Zigzag

Figure 3

Tips

·     
Start
with lining up the edges of the torn clothing to ensure that they are only
touching each other

·     
Set
the sewing machine to the zigzag setting

·     
Start
sewing at least a half inch away from where the torn or the rip begins

·     
Straddle
the torn part with the zigzag stitch while sewing along

Recommendation

·     
If
you notice that the cloth is being pulled together by the thread reduce the
thread tension setting on the sewing machine

·     
Thread
tension setting is done by turning the knobs and screws a little; follow the
settings of the sewing machine manual, in case you are not sure

·     
For
the torn clothing at the middle, where you are using the straight stitching
setting on the sewing machine, you can also darn wit a number of reckless
stitches, whereby you squander the thread to make the broken places new and
very strong

Warning

·     
If
the clothing is torn at the middle, meaning that there is no enough clothing on
which stitching can be done, do not use the zigzag stitch

·     
Set
the sewing machine to the straight stitch and continue.

Step 4: Using a Yogi

Tips

·     
When
you darn up to the branch of the torn to ripped clothing decide whether you
will use a yogi or a frost

·     
Start
with sewing the vertical part of the T torn first

·     
Follow
this with the cross stroke

·     
While
doing this, you will be zigzagging up and down on the rip for several times

Recommendation

·     
In
a situation where the clothing is old, but not rotten, do another stitching row
next to the first one, repeat if need be, until the clothing is reinforced and
strong

·     
While
doing this, you can utilize the stitches that the sewing machine has; this is
an opportunity to learn the type of stitches that the sewing machine has.

  

Step 5: Darning the frayed edge

Figure 4

Tip

·     
The
torn clothing can be frayed and would require darning in such away that the
frays will not be seen

·     
Bind
the frayed edge and stitch using the zigzag setting

Recommendation

·     
For
a clean binding of the frayed edge, cut the long frays, then bind and stitch

Warning

·     
Although
the binding of the frayed edge might take a bit longer, it is better based on
the end results.

·     
This
is especially so when binding the fray edge along the neckline or the armhole,
both of which are visible and can make the clothing either look new and unique
or very old and homemade

Step 6: Reversing the stitched edge

Tips

·     
After
getting at the end of binding the frayed edge, hit the reverse lever on the
sewing machine

·     
This
will stitch back over the edge

·     
Repeat
several times to make the bound edge strong, such that it can last a number of
years

Figure 5 < http://www.instructables.com/id/Darn/>

v References

Anderson, T. (2016). Steps on how to
darn. Retrieved from .

Katrina, (2015). 10 Sewing Mistakes that
will make your Clothes look Homemade. Retrieved from .