The solving skills, a key essence of an

The
principle of engineering is the application of mathematics and scientific
knowledge to design, build and maintain structures, as well as innovate,
research and improve scientific ideas and turn them into reality. These
fundamental concepts are applied to all aspects of engineering, and by studying
it, I am hoping to learn how other engineers use these principles and integrate
them to create something new. The Venturi Principle inspired me to study
engineering by simply showing that given a constricted pipe, for any section,
the same amount of air must pass through it per unit time, so a smaller area
would give a higher speed, and thus lower pressure. This principle was famously
made use of in 1903, when the Wright Brothers made their first flights, which in-turn
has helped propel the exponential development of the industry to where it is at
today.

 

With such
a fast-growing massive-scale industry, experience in-field is therefore vital
for success in the business. A place on the course would mean a chance to gain
knowledge about what the job as an engineer involves, how the sector continually
evolves and what I can do to make it even better, with efficiency,
effectiveness and cleanliness being key.

 

Attending
an engineering taster day at Cambridge University showed me what studying
engineering would entail for a first-year student, and this summer school experience
would enable me to broaden my knowledge of other disciplines and bring them
together to become a more well-rounded individual, while helping me develop and
transfer the skills and expertise into future applications. Imperial offers an invaluable
golden opportunity to kick-start my career in the sector, and if chosen, I will
be fully motivated to take the placement to hand and gain the best experience
from it.

 

In school,
I particularly enjoy STEM subjects, especially physics, as it introduces new
difficult and abstract concepts while also challenging me to think not just
literally, but also laterally, and hone problem solving skills, a key essence
of an engineer’s job. Outside the classroom, I like to broaden my knowledge
with wider reading, giving a talk titled ‘What next?’ in our school’s Physics
and Engineering Society, discussing advancements in space exploration during recent
years, future technologies, and Faster-than-Light travel.

 

I have
already started to further my knowledge by reading ‘Six Easy Pieces’ taken from
the Feynman Lectures on Physics, which introduces many concepts found in the
A-level course, as well as beyond the syllabus. ‘The Physics of Everyday Life’
by Louis A. Bloomfield and Pooley’s ‘Air Pilot’s Manual’ introduced the theory
behind the flight mechanics of aeronautics, which I very much enjoyed, and
Henry Petroski’s ‘Invention by Design’ revealed that every design can be
improved upon. It is this potential to continually progress and create
breakthroughs in the sector which strongly appeals to me.

 

I believe
that I have the academic ability, interest and personal attributes that are
well suited to your summer course, as well as studying engineering at
university and to pursue a career in this field.